Caroline Polachek – Dang

In the realm of artistry, sometimes it’s the unexpected concoctions that turn out to be the most enchanting. Caroline Polachek’s latest single, “Dang,” is a testament to that statement. Proving yet again that she’s not one to be boxed into a particular sound or narrative, Polachek introduces us to a layered, transfixing spectacle that is as perplexing as it is intriguing.

From the outset, “Dang” serves up a heady blend of idiosyncratic lyricism and production. Taking cues from the metallic, industrial-esque beats reminiscent of the pioneering works of SOPHIE, Polachek creates an audio playground that is almost disorienting, but in the best way possible. The rigid beat serves as the backbone, but what really steals the show are the myriad elements she artfully infuses throughout the track.

The lyrics, laced with a blend of whimsy and surrealism, add to the track’s eclectic charm. References to Mary Poppins are juxtaposed against lamentations about spilled milk, creating a dreamlike tapestry that teeters between the fantastical and the mundane. The way she drops the titular “dang” throughout the song—sometimes with exasperation, other times with a cheeky indifference—displays a mastery of how a single word, when employed correctly, can encapsulate a multitude of emotions.

Yet, it’s not just the lyrics that shine. The instrumental interludes, with cascading violins offering a brief, ethereal respite from the stringent beats, show Polachek’s finesse in melding genres and moods. Every time you think you’ve got a handle on the track’s direction, she introduces another element—a muffled sample here, an out-of-nowhere scream there—that keeps you constantly on your toes.



One of the standout moments in the track is undoubtedly the scream. Raw and guttural, it showcases Polachek’s unfettered emotion and theatricality. It’s moments like these, unexpected yet completely authentic, that make “Dang” a standout in her already impressive repertoire.

The cherry on top is the surprise reappearance of Nico Harle’s baby giggle right at the end, a nod to her earlier work, “Bunny Is a Rider.” This little Easter egg, a blend of innocence within a complex sound landscape, hints at Polachek’s ability to interlink her creations, making them parts of a larger narrative.

In “Dang,” Polachek has managed to take the familiar and turn it on its head, crafting a song that is both novel and nostalgically Caroline. It’s a stark departure from some of her previous works, yet it feels right at home in her ever-evolving musical journey. As she ventures into seemingly new territories, one thing remains clear: Polachek is not just a singer or songwriter; she’s a pop auteur, continually pushing the boundaries of what pop music can be and feel like.